CPAP Tx Not Linked to Altered Renal Function in OSA and Cardiovascular Disease

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Participants were gathered from a substudy of the international Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Endpoints trial.
Participants were gathered from a substudy of the international Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Endpoints trial.

HealthDay News — For individuals with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) does not alter renal function, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Kelly A. Loffler, PhD. from Flinders University in Daw Park, Australia, and colleagues examined the effects of CPAP on renal function in individuals with coexisting OSA and cardiovascular disease in a substudy of the international Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Endpoints trial. Renal function and adverse events were compared between 102 CPAP treated and 98 usual-care treated patients.

The researchers found that after a median period of 4.4 years, the median change in estimated glomerular filtration rate did not differ significantly between the CPAP and usual-care groups. No between-group differences were seen in the end-of-study urinary albumin:creatinine ratio or the occurrence of serious renal or urinary adverse events. The findings were not influenced by the level of CPAP adherence.

"CPAP treatment of OSA in patients with cardiovascular disease does not alter renal function, nor the occurrence of renal adverse events," the authors write.

Disclosures: Respironics Sleep and Philips Respironics provided funding for the trial.

Reference

Loffler KA, Heeley E, Freed R, et al. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea treatment on renal function in patients with cardiovascular disease [published online July 25, 2017]. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. doi:10.1164/rccm.201703-0603OC

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