Six-Second Exhalation Appropriate for Nitric Oxide Evaluation in Pediatric Asthma

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The weighted analysis showed no evidence of systematic bias in measurements, demonstrating agreement between exhalation durations.
The weighted analysis showed no evidence of systematic bias in measurements, demonstrating agreement between exhalation durations.

Children with asthma between 7 and 10 years of age who had their fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured using a 6-second exhalation had consistent results that agreed with 10-second exhalation measurements, according to the results of a study published in the Journal of Asthma.

FeNO measurements were taken using a portable electrochemical analyzer. The analyzer had both 6-second and 10-second measurement modes. Results for agreement and repeatability were compared between measurement durations.

Of the 45 participants, 68% were boys and 32% were girls. A total of 43 were able to complete ≥1 FeNO measurement in both the 6- and 10-second modes, and 41 completed 2 measurements in both modes.

Overall means for both modes were 33.59 ppb and 32.46 ppb for the 6- and 10-second modes, respectively. The weighted analysis showed no evidence of systematic bias in measurements, demonstrating agreement between exhalation durations. The mean intrasubject standard deviation for the evaluable population with 2 measurements in both modes was slightly higher but nonsignificant for the 10-second mode (1.828) compared with the 6-second mode (1.380).

“Providing an alternative and feasible option to measure FeNO is important when the children cannot perform a 10-[second] measurement,” the researchers noted. ”[P]hysicians can obtain the valuable information on airway inflammation provided by measuring FeNO using the 6-[second] exhalation mode in most children.”

Reference

Rickard K, Jain N, MacDonald-Berko M. Measurement of FeNO with a portable, electrochemical analyzer using a 6-second exhalation time in 7–10-year-old children with asthma: comparison to a 10-second exhalation [published online November 19, 2018]. J Asthma. doi:10.1080/02770903.2018.1541350

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