HOUSTON — Benralizumab does not induce changes in weight or blood pressure when administered for up to 1 year in patients with severe asthma, suggesting this therapy does not feature the classic adverse events observed with oral corticosteroid treatment. These findings were presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting 2019 held November 7 to 11 in Houston, Texas.

In patients with severe asthma, benralizumab and oral corticosteroids can be used to reduce blood eosinophil counts. Treatment with oral corticosteroids, however, can cause increases in weight and blood pressure and can also have undesirable effects on immune function.

Researchers pooled data from 2 phase 3 studies of patients with severe asthma who received either benralizumab (n=822) or placebo (n=847) every 8 weeks. The sources of these data included the 48-week SIROCCO trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01928771) and the 56-week CALIMA trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01914757). In the presented analysis, the investigators examined changes in weight and blood pressure as well as total leukocyte, lymphocyte, and neutrophil counts and concentrations of immunoglobulin A, E, G, and M.

Over the 1-year duration of the 2 trials, the mean weight for patients treated with benralizumab remained stable from baseline. Patients treated with benralizumab and placebo had similar weight maintenance during this period. Treatment with benralizumab and placebo were also associated with stable blood pressure values over 1 year.


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No differences were observed between the 2 pooled treatment groups with regard to 1-year changes in immunoglobulin concentrations. Benralizumab was associated with greater reduction in total leukocyte counts compared with placebo. No difference was found between the 2 groups in terms of lymphocyte and neutrophil counts.

Reference

Kreindler J, Katial R, Barker P, Newbold P. Benralizumab treatment is not associated with oral corticosteroid-like increases in weight and blood pressure. Presented at: American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting 2019; November 7-11, 2019; Houston, TX. Abstract P221.