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Esophagogastrectomy/transhiatal and transthoracic

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Esophagogastrectomy is a high-risk surgical procedure most commonly performed in patients with esophageal cancer for treatment or palliation. Anesthesiologists caring for such patients should have a thorough understanding of the patients’ disease state for which the surgical procedure is indicated, relevant aspects of the planned surgical…

Repair of Ruptured Biceps Tendon

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure A biceps tendon rupture can occur either proximally or distally. A variety of degenerative, hypovascular and mechanical factors can contribute to tendon compromise: these include excessive strain, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, end-stage renal disease, gout, malignancy, systemic lupus erythematosus, syphilis, tuberculosis, abuse of anabolic steroids and…

Cleft Lip and Palate

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Cleft lip and cleft palate, either alone or in combination, are among the most common congenital anomalies, occurring in approximately 1 in 500 births. Orofacial clefts can lead to significant physiologic disturbance, disrupting the mechanisms of swallowing, breathing, hearing and speech. Feeding is difficult affected neonates…

Subacromial decompression

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Subacromial decompression is performed for treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. This condition occurs in people of all ages, particularly in those exposed to repetitive arm elevation activities such as overhead lifting or throwing. Recurrent inflammation of the bursa that lies between the acromion and the rotator…

Fetal surgery/EXIT procedures/anesthesia for TTTS

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Fetal surgery and anesthesia for fetal surgery are branches of obstetric anesthesia. This form of anesthesia is complicated because anesthetic care is being provided for two patients, mother and fetus simultaneously. The mother of the fetus is essentially being used as a life support system for…

The Infected Parturient

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Infection is the second leading cause of pregnancy-related mortality in the United States (13.6% for 2006-2010). Unlike post-partum hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, mortality from infections has not decreased over the past decades. It is imperative that the anesthesiologist know the source of infection, the…

Repair of Retinal Detachment/Vitrectomy

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure The pathogenesis of retinal detachment is varied. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs upon formation of a tear or hole in the retina that allows vitreous cavity fluid to enter underneath the retina, causing displacement. Exudative detachment is not associated with a tear or hole. Here, subretinal fluid…

Inadvertent dural puncture/wet tap and PDPH management

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Inadvertent dural puncture is a risk of epidural anesthesia and occurs when the needle or catheter punctures the dura and arachnoid maters. The incidence of accidental dural puncture varies on the experience of the provider and is approximately 1.5%. When experts in regional anesthesia were asked…

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disorder affecting adolescents. The disorder is a failure through the zone of hypertrophy of the proximal femoral growth plate typically as a result of stress or trauma. It is classified as stable or unstable based on…

Endoscopic sinus surgery – procedures

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure Endoscopic sinus surgery remains one of the most effective management options for patients with chronic sinusitis. It offers symptomatic relief for 90% of patients and entails a low-risk ambulatory anesthetic for most patients. What are the indications for functional endoscopic sinus surgery? Chronic, recurrent, acute complications…

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