HealthDay News — Prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk for childhood asthma, according to a review published online in Pediatrics.

Tianwen Lai, MD, PhD, from Zhejiang University in China, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to identify 8 population-based studies that assessed acid-suppressive drug use during pregnancy and the risk for childhood asthma in offspring.

In pooled analysis, the researchers found that acid-suppressive drug use in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk for asthma in childhood (relative risk, 1.45). In proton pump inhibitor users, the overall risk for asthma in childhood increased (relative risk, 1.34). Similarly, the risk increased in histamine-2 receptor antagonist users (relative risk, 1.57).


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“The evidence suggests that prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk [for] childhood asthma,” the authors wrote. “This information may help clinicians and parents to use caution when deciding whether to take acid-suppressing drugs during pregnancy because of the risk of asthma in offspring.”

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Reference

Lai T, Wu M, Liu J, et al. Acid-suppressive drug use during pregnancy and the risk of childhood asthma: a meta-analysis [published January 11, 2018]. Pediatrics. doi:10.1542/peds.2017-0889