HealthDay News — Parents who both smoke cigarettes and electronic cigarettes are less likely to have smoke-free car and vape-free car or home policies compared with cigarette users, according to a study published online March 11 in Pediatrics.

Jeremy E. Drehmer, M.P.H., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a secondary analysis of 2017 parental interview data to examine how smoke-free and vape-free home and car policies differ for parents who use cigarettes, e-cigarettes, or both.

The researchers found that fewer dual users had vape-free versus smoke-free home policies (26.3 and 63.8 percent, respectively). Compared with cigarette users, dual users were less likely to have smoke-free car, vape-free home, or vape-free car policies. Compared with cigarette users, dual users were more likely to report smoking, e-cigarette use, and e-cigarette use with children present inside cars. Smoking ≥10 cigarettes per day, using e-cigarettes, and having a youngest child >10 years were associated with not having smoke-free or vape-free home and car policies. Delivery of smoke-free home and car advice was infrequent.

“The large percentages of parents who have not adopted smoke-free and vape-free homes and cars and the low percentages of parents who are asked or advised about keeping homes and cars smoke-free when attending pediatric practices reveals the continued unmet need to implement interventions that will promote safe homes and cars for children,” the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to UpToDate and to pharmaceutical companies relating to smoking cessation.

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